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Saturday, November 28, 2009

How Do You Type?


When someone asks if they can use my computer, it cracks me up to see how they respond to my keyboard.

Out of the 26 letters of the alphabet, only 14 can be still be viewed. The others have been rubbed away from frequent typing. Forget trying to find a vowel, they were the first letters that went.

Yesterday I noticed that the letters "a," "s," and "l" are wrinkled. They look sort of like they've been poorly shrink wrapped. Did I wear down the keys? I have no idea how that happened.

Thankfully the markers on "f" and "j" haven't worn away. In high-school I took a class on how to use an electric typewriter. Thank goodness for Word . . that's all I have to say. I've never used a typewriter since, but I learned to touch type.

Most writers I know touch type as well, though I've met a few who don't.

How about you?




11 comments:

Sharon Kirk Clifton said...

Jessica, the sports reporter at a newspaper where I worked was especially hard on keyboards. He had fairly long fingernails, and they must have been hard, because the keys on his keyboard were ridged from being pounded with those nails. Sliced and diced would be a more accurate description.

Gina Holmes said...

I have worn out letters before. Years ago on a word processor I'd kept forever. Now I go through my laptops about every two years. They fall apart (mostly because I drop them) before the letters have a chance to wear off.

Gina Holmes said...

I have worn out letters before. Years ago on a word processor I'd kept forever. Now I go through my laptops about every two years. They fall apart (mostly because I drop them) before the letters have a chance to wear off.

Alissa said...

My letters are starting to show signs of wear, but are not quite off yet. I remember a computer used by multiple employees at work had a lot of letters worn off, it never bothered me, but apparently a non-touch typist was bothered enough to go through with a Sharpie and redo the letters.

Edna said...

I have a cordless mouse and keyboard so some of my letters are worn off also and I keep droping the mouse, that poor old thing may fall anywhere. It is a wonder to me either one is still working.


mamat2730(at)charter(dot)net

Jessica Dotta said...

Thanks, guys!

When my husband purchased his first lap top, I told him the secret to keeping it is to have a USB keyboard (I use one too.)

I've gone through several keyboards with my novel.

Jessica Dotta said...

Thanks, guys!

When my husband purchased his first lap top, I told him the secret to keeping it is to have a USB keyboard (I use one too.)

I've gone through several keyboards with my novel.

Lori Lowe said...

I'm so thankful for the high school typing class I took many years ago. I can't imagine how much time I have saved as a writer by learning to type quickly -- nearly fast enough to keep up with my thoughts.

I generally transcribe source phone interviews in process, which is also a great time saver.
Cheers!

Anonymous said...

And here I thought I was the only one with barely-there and invisible letters on my keys!

It's always good to know you're not alone; it's even better to know you're in good company.

Thanks for sharing this one!

Loree Lough said...

Ack. Hit SEND by mistake before I could peck my info into the 'write' boxes.

Comforting to know I'm not the only author with barely-there and invisible letters on the keyboard, and it feels good to know I'm in such good company, too!

Happy key-clacking, y'all!
Loree

Loree Lough said...

And my comment follows one posted by Lori Lowe? Yikes. Am I in the mirror room of The Fun House or have I found my alter ego?

LOL