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Friday, November 05, 2010

Guest Blog ~ Healthy Research 101 ~ Judy Gaman


So You Want to Write About Health?

Judy Gaman

So you want to write a health book? No problem, but you need to know where to start and where to go for accurate information. As a co-author of Stay Young 10 Proven Steps to Ultimate Health, I was in charge of finding the proof behind the “Proven” part of our title.

The internet is filled with misguided misinformation. While you can find tons of information, you have to
consider the source. My degree from George Washington University is in clinical research therefore, I have been trained to sniff out claims that are self-serving and not based on reputable sources. For example, websites selling vitamins may say that their particular product is perfect for treating “xyz” and then go on to give facts about the disease or disorder. Of course, this is not the best source for you to use when researching facts.

Often I will use several sources to formulate one page of a book. For example, if I am going to write about a disease, I first reference a couple of sources like WebMD to find a way to describe the disease in layman’s terms. Then I will research multiple sites before offering information on symptoms and treatment options. Always go to the gold standard when referencing a topic. For example, if you are writing on heart disease, be sure to reference the American Heart Association. Since many authorities change their recommendations along with recent technology or medical advancements, be s
ure you are checking with them to get the most up to date information.

I would also like to advise you to reach out to experts. These people are not necessarily untouchable and are often eager to help. Years ago, I was working on a book about executive health and in particular, a chapter on the history of medicine. I was able to track down Paul C. Lauterbur who won a Nobel Prize in 2003 for the invention of the MRI. He even gave me a photo of him working on it from his personal collection!

So, in closing, I want to encourage you to put out books and articles that are well rounded, respectfully researched, and that celebrate those who have taken us to where we are
today.


Judy Gaman is an award-winning, published author and has been entertaining and educating audiences for years. She has a degree in health sciences, with a concentration in clinical research administration, from the prestigious George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences.



1 comments:

Kelly Klepfer said...

Thanks for the tips, Judy.