Monday, April 04, 2016

Surprised By My Own Voice - Guest Post by Morgan Busse

Morgan L. Busse writes fantasy and steampunk for the adult market. She is the author of the Follower of the Word series, including Daughter of Light, Christy and Carol Award finalist, and currently free on Amazon. Morgan lives on the West Coast with her husband and four children. You can find out more about Morgan at

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Voice. That elusive part of writing. The part that distinguishes one writer from another. Voice is hard to nail down, but once found, brings a uniqueness to one’s writing. 

So what happens when your voice doesn’t match your genre? 

I write fantasy. When most people think of fantasy, they think of J.R.R. Tolkien. His voice is eloquent, lengthy, lyrical, and full of description. Many fantasy writers share a similar kind of voice. It’s the standard when it comes to this genre.

However, my voice is different. I discovered my voice after writing Daughter of Light, the first book in my epic fantasy series. My writing voice is blunt, short, and to the point. I tell the story in a strong, quick tempo, moving along at a clip pace. Not the style usually employed by the average fantasy writer. 

A couple reviews reflected the fact that some readers did not like my voice. They wanted the poetic sound usually found in fantasy. 

I didn’t know what to do, so I decided to try and change my voice. I believed I needed to write in a certain way in order to be a fantasy writer. It was like trying to write a square word into a round story. It didn’t work. In fact, those scenes stuck out so bad that my editor called me on it. He gave me the freedom to be me, and to write like me. 

So I tossed out those scenes and went back to writing like Morgan. 

After reading an article a friend of mine wrote about voice, I realized even more how important it is to embrace my own voice. Not only is voice my style of writing, it encompasses the stories I write and how I write them. No one can write the stories I write, in the manner that I write them. When I write a story, I draw on the things I have went through during my life: my parent’s divorce, death of loved ones, loss of jobs, loss of house, cancer scares, months of wondering how we would survive unemployment, deep depression, and emotional wounds dealt by people. 

Throughout my life, even in the darkest times, I found hope. And I clung to that hope like a life thread. Through my writing, I explore the darkness and how to find hope. 

My life and my writing style have formed my voice. To not be true to my voice would be the equivalent of not being true to myself. 
Sometimes I don’t like my voice. I wish I could write eloquent prose, running along with beautiful descriptions, long colorful sentences, and dialogue that sounds more ancient. 

But that’s not me. I’m Morgan and I will write in Morgan’s voice. After all, I’m the only one who can write my stories. 

How about you? As a writer, have you discovered your voice? Did you like it or did you wish you could write like someone else? 

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About Tainted: 

What Happens When Your Soul Dies?  

Kat Bloodmayne is one of the first women chosen to attend the Tower Academy of Sciences. But she carries a secret: she can twist the natural laws of science. She has no idea where this ability came from, only that every time she loses control and unleashes this power, it kills a part of her soul. If she doesn't find a cure soon, her soul will die and she will become something else entirely. 

After a devastating personal loss, Stephen Grey leaves the World City Police Force to become a bounty hunter. He believes in justice and will stop at nothing to ensure criminals are caught and locked up. However, when Kat Bloodmayne shows up in his office seeking his help, his world is turned upside down. 

Together they search World City and beyond for a doctor who can cure Kat. But what they discover on the way goes beyond science and into the dark sphere of magic. 

* * * * * * * * * * 

Ronie Kendig is an award-winning, bestselling author who grew up an Army brat. After twenty-five years of marriage, she and her hunky hero husband have a full life with their children, a Maltese Menace, and a retired military working dog in beautiful Northern Virginia. She can be found at:
     Facebook (
     Twitter (@roniekendig)
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     Instagram (@kendigronie)
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Reviewers call Ronie's newest release, EMBERS, "Simply amazing!" 


Joan Campbell said...

I love the reminder to be true to our own voices - thanks Morgan.

Morgan L. Busse said...

Thanks Joan :)

Southern-fried Fiction said...

Voice is so important! I'm glad you stuck to yours. Readers will embrace it. :)

Carrie Lynn Lewis said...


I have exactly the same problem, though in reverse. I love writing the way the old masters did. Prose is my friend!

But my favorite genre is mystery.

Not a good match!

So your experience is especially encouraging. I need to take a page from your book and be more bold and confident in writing the stories I want to write in the voice that's uniquely mine.

Thank you so much!

Morgan L. Busse said...

I'm glad my post encouraged you to be bold, Carrie :)

Jim said...

Your sketch is exactly what I needed to see today. I have countless thoughts and cross-thoughts racing about in my head. However writing is on hold due to illness. Im too ill to write but thankfully I'm able to read thid from you.
Regards m

Stuart said...

Great and encouraging post, Morgan. Good to remember that sometimes it's better to break out of the mold than force yourself into it.

Helen said...

Go Morgan! Be yourself! Nothing hinders development than trying to be something you are not. Congratulations again on your new book! :)